The Robin Family

Baby Robins Awaiting their Mom's Instructions
I have had a family of robins nesting here since I can remember moving in.  I recall at removing at least 4 nests from the exact same location it seen wrapped up in there.ms that it has been the same robins returning every year.  Those nests are usually compromised of twigs, grasses, and leaves though on occasion I have noticed things I would consider garbage wrapped in there too.  The mother has always tolerated my presence reasonably well as long as I didn't venture too close to the nest.  We have always watched each other and kept a respectful distance in years past.  It must have been at least 5 years now, because one year they nested out front in my crab apple tree.

This must be a prime nesting location.  Many times robins will look for a sheltered nesting spot if they can find one.  Ideally predators would not have access to the back side of the nest and the front side would have an open view to any looming dangers.  They should have a clean water source nearby, it should provide camouflage to the birds, predators should be deterred from getting to the nest should they find it's location, the nest to allow them to blend into the surroundings, and offer an ample supply of food in the surrounding area as well.

Mother Robin 
Well this year I don't know if the original robins died or what (I have heard they live 5-6 years though I am not certain how accurate that claim is), but this mother is constantly swooping at me even when I am much further away than I have been any previous year.  Now it seems if I am anywhere even close to the back yard she dive bombs me!  She wasn't this bad at first, but the last several days she has gotten progressively worse.  I think it is because the babies are almost ready to fledge (leave) though because they are looking quite bit these days.  I did read online somewhere that robins usually spend about 13 days in the nest from the time they hatch to the time the fledge.

I must have popped out the door at the perfect time because they were all looking at their mom in the tree nearby.  I managed to stay in the doorway by the house so I couldn't get "scolded" and swooped by her.  She seems to sound a bit "angry" when I am too close and her call is closer to a "yelling" sort of "tone".  It is quite possible that is all in my imagination though as I seem to give animals attributes that they don't really display.

She is constantly standing guard over them in nearby trees as are usually several other robins, ever watchful over the young birds in her nest.  You don't see their presence as much when the babies first hatch.  I believe it must be because the other robins are on a constant hunt for food to feed either themselves or their young.  I understand that the siblings help the parents to take care of the young birds often times if they don't have a mate and nest of their own.

That is certainly understandable as raising these quickly growing babies would require vast quantities of food.  I have seen them capture a wide variety of food for the babies.  Mostly it seems that they bring insects and worms to the young birds.  I imagine the protein must be necessary to sustain such rapid growth.  Though I have seen robins eat various berries in years past.

Thank  you for stopping by to chat with me. Please leave me a message, I'd  love to hear your thoughts! Cindy


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